LABS: The Interstellar Medium in Galaxies


LABS: The Interstellar Medium in Galaxies

Saturday, June 29th • 10:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
540 South Marengo Avenue, Pasadena, California 91101
Grade Level: 7-12

Cost: $60 (Staff will invoice for payment after registration.)


Galaxies are made of more than just stars. A rich interstellar medium permeates the space in between stars, formed out of material ejected from dying stars and supernovae, out of which new stars are formed. The detailed “life cycle” of this interstellar medium has profound impacts on the evolution of galaxies, from the small, compact, and irregular structures seen billions of years ago to the ordered spiral and elliptical galaxies we see today. Furthermore, understanding the physics and chemistry of this medium is essential to our understanding of how stars form. We will explore techniques astrophysicists use to study the interstellar medium, including spectroscopy from large telescopes and advanced computer simulations. 

Please note upon registration, a LABS Series team member will be in touch with you via email to confirm and finalize your child’s enrollment in the workshop.

About the Speaker

Ms. Theios is currently studying for a doctoral degree in astrophysics at the California Institute of Technology and received a B.S. in astrophysics from UCLA. Her research focuses on understanding the formation and evolution of galaxies by studying large numbers of galaxies at the peak of cosmic star formation 10 billion years ago (or 10 billion light-years away) using the Keck telescopes on Mauna Kea in Hawaii. Specifically, she is studying the properties of galactic winds and how galaxies in this epoch transition to the types of galaxies we see today.

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